A Fire What ?

Yep…it’s our Fire Pit Yardscape!!!  We have finally started our fire pit area!!!  We purchased our fire pit last fall and have been planning our “pit  area” for a long time now!!  This is only the beginning!

shed

Not too long ago there sat an old worn out shed on this spot.  When we found an awesome lady that wanted the old shed – for a chicken coop no less – she came to our place and my hubby helped her take down the shed, loaded it on her trailer, and waved bye bye to them both.

shed spot

We were left with a 10’ x 10’ area that was nothing but dirt.  Then a  light bulb went off!  We had been planning for our fire pit area to be on our concrete patio, but this area would be so perfect!!!

Hubby and I moved the fire pit over to the “sandlot” and it looked so pitiful there all by itself.  We needed seating and had thought about building benches or getting some cool looking lawn chairs…but then, my daughter and son-in-law had a HUGE tree cut down in their front yard!!  Another light bulb exploded in my head – STUMPS !

fire pit

So, here is the beginning of our Fire Pit Yardscape! We are going to get four more tree stumps from my daughter soon.   I will be moving my outdoor chandelier to this area and also adding solar lighting on the ground and eventually some lighting on poles around the pit.  This is going to be awesome for hanging out with friends, roasting marshmallows with the grandkids, and just enjoying an evening fire with my hubby.

Now…if we can just get all of that done before cooler weather we’ll be OK!

Fun Fact Friday – Do you ever sell chicks or eggs? Is that regulated at all?

eggs4

 

Our next reader question is – Do you ever sell chicks or eggs? Is that regulated at all?   Great questions!!

We don’t raise chickens, so as far as selling chicks, I had to research that and here  is the North Carolina Statutes on Chick Dealers and Hatcheries.  I learned a lot reading through this…thank goodness we never intended, nor had a desire, to hatch or sell chicks!

So, yes, there are laws governing selling chicks and hatching eggs (eggs that have been fertilized and are being sold for hatching purposes).

Selling eggs for eating (unfertilized eggs) we do!  North Carolina law – the “Egg Law” – can be found here.  The short version of the Egg Law is “a producer marketing eggs of his own production shall be exempt from this section when such marketing occurs on the premises where the eggs are produced, processed, or when ungraded sales do not exceed 30 dozen per week.”

Our Oily Homestead Eggs

 

The way I read that is that if a farm sell eggs that their chickens lay and the sale takes place on the property where the eggs were laid, they are exempt from the grading of eggs, or if they sell less than 30 dozen ungraded eggs a week (that’s a bunch of chickens y’all  – 360 eggs a week – that would be a max of 360 hens!!!)  Also, containers must have the word “Eggs” on the container along with the farm’s name.  We purchase our egg cartons at our local Tractor Supply Store.

We sell eggs to our friends that know the value of fresh eggs!  We only do this when we have an abundance of eggs – our main reason for having our hens is so that we are more self-sustainable – but when we have more than we will eat, we sell a dozen or two!

eggs2

 

That’s pretty much it in an “eggshell” – NC laws for selling chicks and eggs – at least that is what my research turned up!

Fun Fact Friday next week will tackle the question – “Are there any common chicken practices that you believe to be harmful or just less-than-ideal? Certain coop setups, feed, nesting materials, etc.”

See you next week !

Fun Fact Friday – How many chickens do you need?

The first reader question we got was “How did you decide how many chickens you need? I mean how many would fit?”

That’s a GREAT question !  One that is very important to decide from the start!

In our research, of both the internet and local “chicken parent” friends, we determined that 6 hens would be a good number for us to start out our backyard flock.  Based on averages for our area, a good laying breed, such as the White Leghorn, will lay 5-6 eggs per week – if they are overachievers you may even get an egg every day from them !  Rhode Island Reds are also good layers we hear.

Since our family consists of my awesome hubby and me, we decided on 6 hens to start off so we’d hopefully get a couple dozen eggs each week.  We both love eggs and eat them daily!  We did get 3 hens before we really researched well, and luckily those 3 (a Delaware – named Della – and 2 Welsummers – Brownie and Broody) are great layers too and we wanted some brown eggs along with the white ones from the Leghorns (all named “Holly Hen” since we got them from our friend Holly)!!!  No, we are not very original with our chicken names, don’t judge! 🙂

So, from our 6 ladies we usually get 4-6 eggs a day…those leghorns really ARE great layers – which gives us an average of about 3 dozen per week.

We have recently added 6 Ameraucana pullets, but they are only 2 months old now and have not yet been incorporated into our little flock yet.  They will lay blue/green eggs when they do start producing, one of the reasons that we got them – and they were hand raised by our good friends, Hannah and her son Jacob, at Humble Hollow Farm.

mike and chickens

We decided on the extra hens for several reasons – the first one being that we are addicted to our chickens and wanted more!!!  Seriously, we LOVE have chickens in our backyard – even our little dog Mike likes the hens!  When we let them out of the run to free range a little during the day, he loves to lay and watch them too !  Another reason is that we have family and friends that love fresh eggs, so we wanted to be able to give some to family and sell some too (which is another question we will be answering in our series on Fun Fact Fridays – “do you ever sell chicks or eggs and are there any regulations”.

mike and chickens2
That’s our dog Mike with the chickens…he thinks he is a black and white rooster!                          He loves the hens!

So, the short answer to the question of  “How did you decide how many chickens you need? I mean how many would fit?” is that we wanted about 3 dozen eggs a week so we chose 6 hens to make sure we got the amount we wanted.

The answer to the second part of that question is this:  we purchased our coop/run after we decided on 6 hens and bought/built according to the size appropriate for 6 hens.  Our first coop (we bought a second one for the 6 new pullets) will hold 6-8 hens at night and has 4 nesting boxes (you really only need about 2 for 6 hens as they share nesting boxes very well!). We also expanded our “run” to accommodate 12 hens to 300 square feet.

Chickens need approximately 4 square feet of coop space (nighttime roosting and egg laying) and 10 square feet of run space per chicken.  Of course the more room you can give them, the happier they will be and happy hens = good laying hens!

I hope that answered the question well….hubby and I really enjoy learning more about our chickens, so these questions have been alot of fun !!!!  Keep asking and we will be back next Friday for another Fun Fact Friday!

hubby and Blanche

Cleaning the Coop!

A great natural alternative for cleaning those coops! No harmful chemicals, all natural, and safe for your feathered friends!

We always try to use a chemical free product whenever possible, for pretty much everything!  A lot of what we use for household cleaning, skin care, pet care, and now “chicken care” are DIY recipes made with essential oils!

I am loving this coop cleaning spray! Smells fresh and has great cleaning properties!  Read more about lemon oil here, and to find out more about essential oils, check out our “How do I get those essential oils” tab on our main menu!

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